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in manhattan in 1967. i say that rarely in the boston public library, but i was. these are two images from my youth. we have similar images of new york and boston in the 1970s as well. the bottom image is gerald ford denying new york for a successful bailout. indeed, new york was very much headed for the trash heap of history. the city had been hemorrhaging by the thousands. it was not automobile production in detroit, it was production in new york city. and that was decimated by globalization and new technology. the city had been caught in a spiral of disorder and rising crime rate. racial conflicts just like here in boston, and the fiscal situation had gotten out of control with budgets that were far too high for the city to afford. it looked as if new york was going to go back to the weeds. like this image of jimmy carter wandering through the wasteland, and it really seemed as if the planet of the apes image of the statue of liberty rising was possible. with the cities were things that as time had come and gone, the future of the city's seemed dim because their original reason has largely
for our panel. [applause] >> up next booktv takes you to the fourth annual boston book festival for a panel called the future of reading. this is about an hour and 15 minutes. >> good afternoon. my name is amy ryan, president of the boston public library and is an honor and pleasure to welcome you to the boston public library for the boston book festival. i would like to thank all the staff, particularly the abrupt porter, founder of the boston book festival for this amazing lineup this weekend of content rich programs. [applause] >> you can imagine my intense interest in this program, the future of reading and all of us in the library world are. i look forward to hearing your comments and what i would like to do is introduce the moderator, said campbell. [applause] >> it is my pleasure to be here today and i would like to start by thanking debbie and her team for putting on a great event. it is wonderful to spend the day here. very exciting for me to be on this particular panel because it cuts to the heart of what this event is all about, reading. and what the future of reading
. and the strange way of her family, she was sent to a fancy finishing school in boston. were she was taught to dance well and to become a witty conversationalist and a striking young woman. in 1864, she had her debut in new york. and she came back here a few years later. nothing could outdo the flurry of excitement when she returned to new york in the fall of 1860. the city shimmered with news that the prince of wales was coming to visit. in his honor, a group of leading citizens was organizing a ball. society than was very excited. excited couples who had paid $10 apiece arrive at the academy of music. women curl their hair and they had special nods to acquaintances and friends. precisely at 10:00 p.m., they prayed and sang god save the queen and the slight friends stepped into the room. for two hours, nearly 3000 of new york's finest citizens rushed like schoolgirls to meet him. in a mad crush, the wooden floor collapsed. the band played furiously. the guests rushed to follow and they piled their plates with lobster salad, and filled their glasses with champagne. at 2:00 a.m., the dance f
to be a boston celtics t-shirt. he didn't know the means of the words on his chest, the shirt probably came from some pile of donation, but it showed the reach of the nba brand. you see this a lot. and tonight, there's some good-hearted men within the nba, trying to help similar children in ways that go far beyond second-hand t-shirts. here's jeffrey kofman. >> here we go. one last time. one last time. ready? recover. get them. >> reporter: they just might be the luckiest boys in africa. and maybe the world. >> excellent work, guys, excellent work. >> reporter: selected from 20 countries, flown here to johannesburg for four days of intensive basketball coaching -- >> basket one, far side, go. >> reporter: from some of the biggest names in the world of sports. >> nba, we are coming. >> nba, we are coming. >> reporter: that's nba, as in national basketball association. and that is nba all-star dikembe mutombo, all 72" of him. you put a lot of energy into this. why? >> because somebody did care for me for me to be where i am today. i feel like it's an obligation, to me and my duty and my power, to
begin with breaking news, a leveling buildings in springfield, massachusetts. fox 25 out of boston. officials say there was a gas leak in the area. witnesses reported windows shattering, brings flies, even a mushroom cloud rising above the epicenter of the explosion. folks say they felt and heard the boom from miles away. abulbasher of in people had significant injuries. we are told several buildings were damaged including a scores gentlemen's club right at the center of the blast. our chief fox report correspondent jonathan hunt is live with the news. we are told, jonathan, there was trouble shortly before the blast. >> yeah, john. about 4:20 eastern, this afternoon, there was, in the words of one local reporter. a real stench of gas in the several blocks surrounding what turned out to be the site of the bomb's blast in downtown springfield, massachusetts. utility workers were apparently on scene working on this. and according to that same reporter, the smell of gas had dissipated a great deal just before strangely the explosion actually happened. that was 5:30 eastern. some 90 mi
-span. but what soldiers now placed on century duty on the road in and out of boston and on guard outside the homes, officials and with british artillery now aimed at the town house of the general court, it is easy to understand why many boston residents felt threatened by the occupation. many he is how some soldiers try to stir up racial tensions in their town. not everyone in boston is white. for instance, with an -- within a month and there are rival, three british officers had been discovered encouraging some african american slaves in boston to attack their white masters. one of the stock officers assured these black bostonians that the soldiers were there to procure their freedom and that with their help and assistance, we should be able to drive all the liberty bowl is to the devil. while that slaves he talked to ignore these lies, the british army was not there to free the slaves. several white residents marched complaints -- loged complaints. >> colonial life in british occupied boston, saturday night at 8:00 eastern, part of a holiday weekend now through monday morning on c-span
felt threatened. soldiers tried to stir up racial tension. of course, not everyone in boston is white. within a month of their arrival, three british officers are discovered encouraging african american slaves in boston to attack their white masters. one of those drunken officers assured the black bostonians that the soldiers had come to procure their freedom. with their help, they should be able to drive the liberty boys to the devil. the british army is not in boston to free the slaves. several white residents lodge complaints. captain wilson and his friends had engaged in a dangerous act to foment slave dissatisfaction. >> a discussion on how veterans are treated when returning from war. we will hear from: paul and general stanley mcchrystal, former commander of troops in -- colon powell and general stanley mcchrystal. this is about an hour-and-a- half. [applause] >> thank you for being here. this is a marvelous idea. there is an appetite in america for big ideas that unite us. >> a larger idea that we should all be thinking about is how we treat our returning veterans from the two
in colonial boston, you can imagine what that might have been like. when i was writing about franklinite realize a large part of the story was going to consist of franklin growing old because he became america's emissary to france during the american revolution at the age of 70. i started writing about franklin when i was around 40 and i really wondered whether i was going to be able to understand what it was like to grow old and infirm which was a large part of a franklin story. partly for this reason, i decided, and this is carried through in my other book, i decided to tell my stories, i try to relate the lives of my characters as much as possible through the perceptions, the words of people who knew them. my books tend to have more eyewitness stuff than some others. if i have a choice between writing a scene in my own words and writing a scene in the words of somebody who was mayor, i will tend toward the person who was there. that conveys a certain authenticity and it relieves me of the burden really of sort of providing the authority because the question anyone should have is how d
of this too is kennedy had around in a close-knit group. they are often called the boston mafia or the kennedy mafia or whatever. there were people who went back of the political career and robustly be generally come committee paid to democratic politics. but in the ex-con in the cabinet committee surrounded himself with a remarkably centrist range of people. several republicans. director of central intelligence , robert mcnamara who is not overtly political. douglas had actually made sure a lot of his advisers were actually very centrist. he was not getting left-leaning partisan people when he was making important decisions. >> host: that pascua must question the taste or do dedicated many years to the miller center of public affairs and the recordings project. talk about the value of these tapes, but also the potential pitfalls. some have said because the tapes are so wonderful that we can focus too much on them and there might be a danger to that. >> guest: absolutely. as you point out at the university of virginia we've been working on these tapes, all as sixth president eagerly taped arou
, sunday night at 8:00 p.m. >> with soldiers placed on a century duty on the road in and out of a boston, and on guard outside the homes of officials, and of british artillery now aimed at the townhouse, of the general court, it is easy to understand why many of felt threatened. of course not everyone in boston is white. within a month of their arrival in 1768, three british officers, probably drunk had been discovered encouraging african american slaves to attack their white masters. one of the drug officers assured the officersbostonians that the soldiers were coming to a procurer their freedoms. while of the slaves sensibly ignored these lies, the british army is not in a boston to free the slaves. several white residents launched complaints to captain wilson and is probably drug friends, engaging in a dangerous rebellion. >> tonight at 8:00 p.m. eastern, part of the holiday weekend now through monday morning on c-span 3, american history tv. >> "washington journal" continues. host: paul rothstein is a georgetown university law professor. talking about seceding from the united states.
, but springfield was a city where people who couldn't get a job in boston, couldn't get a job in new york would come to springfield, a city of about 170,000. and everybody was either irish, italian or they were french- canadian. and it was important to them to know where you came from. i said, well, i came from senegal valley. what? [laughter] but that was an education, just being in springfield. and this country is, it's about the, it is the great meeting place of people from all over the world. and somehow they get here, and they're free. it's -- and once, well, it's a fantastic accomplishment. i started to say america's a wonderful country, but it's -- [inaudible] >> there are some, of course, they probably don't know what they're talking about, but there are some that criticize some of your books that some of the characters are one-dimensional or simplistic or play to stereotypes. >> i think that with pride. so would dickens. [laughter] try to find some complicateed side of the great lawyer in -- [inaudible] i'll send you a postcard, the name are come to me. the name will come to me. i brus
. >> well, my family came down from boston. my in-laws now. and that is a group of all of us. and way, way, way in the back is the parade. this is my first time spending thanksgiving in new york city with the parade, and i didn't realize how all the streets are closed off. i'm like oh, we'll just walk up to it. we saw papa smurf. we saw spiderman. so the kids were happy. >> this is your first married holiday. like me this is my first married holiday. but because of work, we didn't have time to travel so. we volunteered for an organization in new york that provides home and shelter to lgbt youth. that is the before picture of the yams. that is the after. >> who was cooking? >> this was a combination. if you saw that shot, we had patrick, who was taking everybody to the gun show. [ laughter ] >> two tickets, right? >> but ally sheedy was in that picture. the actress and her daughter. it was a new oven. >> it's true. sometimes they just don't work way they should. it's a good excuse. >> blame the appliances. >> if you have a stash of marshmallows, you cover up the burns. >> good tips. we'll b
takes command of the continental army he goes to boston and sees black men with guns and knows he's not going to build a self this to his brethren south carolina and georgia. he stops that. eventually he changed his mind when he needed more bodies and his army peer we always have to weigh these things. they are not black-and-white issues. he was a man of his time, part of the society utterly dependent on slavery and knew he was not going to change the minds of his fellow slaveholders. we point to these founding fathers and genuinely with admiration. but this was clearly where they did not see the great conflagration that was coming. how still out c. davis is the author on "in depth" on booktv on c-span 2. a better after we have with some questions have been preapproval shape as now. we have an hour and half program. we'll be right back. >> host: and we're back live with kenneth davis, author and historian in new york city. this is booktv on c-span 2. mr. davis come you say when it comes to your career, your writing career that she give a lot of credit to join davis. who is that? >
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13

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